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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
that pain that can hold these elected officials accountable and to act for responsibly. the reality is that, i have worked in in town 20 years, politics rules the day. the dose of reality, the pain, shut down of maybe -- shut down of the government services and operations. that type of pain, i think is the only thing that is going to, in the long run, get these folks in town to make sure this doesn't happen again and to act responsibly. as you said at the kickoff of this show, to really kind of look at these government programs and see if they are really necessary. >> you are talking about thousands and thens of government job, agencies going out of business, at least temporarily, economists saying if this doesn't kick in, we could go into a recession. >> it's time for bad-tasting medicine for this nation. the election is over. but have you a president that thinks he has the moral high ground, as a result of the election on the tax issue. and you have the republicans that have an identity crisis and are ignorant. we need to walk away, the extreme wings of both parties ad have reasonable peo
there after the election. he says if there's something worse going on, he can't see it. >> i think there's a marked difference between this negotiation and what took place two summers, i guess, ago between speaker boehner and the president when frankly i thought the white house did a poor job of its advocacy for its own position. this is different. it's as if they learned i lesson. they're digging in deeply this time around. they have the wind at their back because of an election result. it's a strategy. as you mentioned he's campai campaigning today. it's like the campaign didn't end. >> chris, let me bring you in. a lot of people talk about this latest interview with secretary geithner. let me play a little bit of what he had to say regarding the fiscal cliff and the threat that looms. let me play it. >> when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy, those making more than $250,000, if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of
with the republicans. >> that's it. >> and that's -- that is the lesson of his election. >> instead of backwards the way he did his first two years. >> exactly right. >> axelrod is coming on tomorrow and we've taken that mustache off. if it's way too early it's "morning joe." stick around right now though for chuck todd "the daily rundown." >>> take it to the bank. timothy geithner says the white house is ready to go over the cliff. republicans might stucmble, though, into having some leverage if they end up backing the tax rate plan now and kick the rest of the can to february. one top republican governor has some stinging sarcasm for his own party's position. in the middle east the situation in syria turns from serious to scary. concerns over chemical weapons has secretary clinton conferring with her russian counterpart today to try to avoid deadly developments. >>> an nbc news exclusive, afghanistan's president hamid karzai talks about his country's future and ongoing insecurity and blames the taliban of course. guess who else? nato and the united states. good morning from washington. it's th
just lost re-election and the eight or so seats. on the other hand, he still has a very diverse caucus in terms of ideology and it's going to be very difficult. you'll notice in hiss comments he didn't say no to 37%. that said, if he agreed to 37% and he's basically bilateral talks with the president, who says the kwaux is going to approve that. he could end up with a lot of egg on his face if he agrees with the president on this, they go forward with the vote, and it doesn't pass. >> david, the office of management and budget, omb, asking government agencies to figure out what they would cut if we do go over this fiscal cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over t
on the november mid term election? and if you hook at-- and then later on, reflexively supported the regime in ruwan da when there were more war crimes committed and since vowed to heal that, but, you know, you've seen her political statements recently that showed there's a political side of susan rice and willingness for talking points that we can't afford as secretary of state and john kerry, he was part of the foreign senate relations committee and he was back in the late 60's and talked about war crimes that he reportedly saw against the vietnam war and you have some track records that don't make them the best fit. >> there are numerous republicans, john mccain, lindsey graham, a barraso who sates i would support john kerry as secretary of state who in their words would cruise through a nomination. and how would an affect if those two are in place? >> if you like what's in the last four years, you're going to get more of the same. deep defense cuts. if you had john kerry as secretary of defense. what we need is a strong secretary of defense, in spite of drawdowns and budget cuts is goin
, sounding very pessimistic today. are we headed over the edge? and after the election in a bruising defeat, what's next for the republican party? we'll talk to one top outgoing gop senator. good sunday afternoon to you, you are watching msnbc, the place for politics. there are no signs right now of a break in the deadlocked talks to avert the so-called fiscal cliff, the devastating combinations of tax increase and spending cuts that kick in january 1st. both sides seem to dig in this morning on the sunday talk shows. >> the only thing standing in the way of that would be a refusal by republicans that the rates would have to go up on the wealthiest americans, and i don't really see them doing it. >> right now, i would say we're nowhere, period, we're nowhere. >> that somber assessment today from house speaker john boehner, as geithner, the point man, went on all five sunday talk shows, cnbc, washington correspondent aman javers joining me live now. did geithner offer anything new today? >> he really didn't. he thinks the republicans are bluffing here and they are not prepared to go all the
is actually in a stronger position in his caucus than when he was elected two years ago. how is he doing, do you think? >> well, i think he's in a stronger position because republicans feel like they're in a weaker position. i think a lot of republicans who might prefer a different leader don't feel they have the luxury of that right now. in fact, even congressman kantor and others, who boehner didn't think he could count on the last time around, are being supportive. republicans are trying to calculate how much they have to give in now and is there a way to fall back with the idea of being able to move ahead in a more aggressive way next year. that's why you saw the president in a very preemptive way trying to rule out the idea of tying talks to next february to raising the debt ceiling. >> alan simpson, the co-chair of the president's deficit commission, was on the "today" show this morning and he said all this talk about either side being able to go off the cliff is ridiculous. let me play that for you. >> when you have leaders of parties and people from the administration saying i think
that has to do with coal. democrat, republican, marxist, whatever. whoever you would elect from west virginia they're going to vote a certain way on coal. and the fact that we now have this incredibly distributed development because of the fracking boom means a lot of different places now are geographically playing. that goes two ways. one way is we produce more senators from the state of west virginia and how they vote. the other is we produce this broad grassroots activactivism. >> look at this last election. why was president obama as muted as he was about climate and about oil and gas and coal production? well, virginia, colorado, ohio, pennsylvania. these are -- >> michigan. >> the way our electoral college is, we only worry about ten states invested in oil and fwas production. >> somes back to the economics as well. i look at my home state of pennsylvania where we had the early stages of huge boom of marcellus shale. hundreds of wells deployed. some companies are down to a couple wells. why? because the price has plummeted. the reason it's relevant to the politics is if this is
we asked -- these are exit polls from november 6, from the last election, of course. should same-sex marriage be legally recognized, yes, 49%, no, 46%. obviously, the country is closely divided on this. but we have seen a little bit of a shift in the numbers. brian, do you think that the time has come that attitudes about this have changed and the court will go with that change? >> no, i don't think that's the case at all. i mean, look, six months ago, north carolina voted by over 61% to protect marriage as the union of a man and a woman. of course, there were the four deep blue liberal statings that voted to redefine marriage, but that's an indication of the future of the you country. there is no constitutional right to redefine marriage. our founding fathers didn't see it that way, the last supreme court decision, the united states supreme court said there was no federal question here. so this is essentially making the law up as you go along, it is reading into the constitution. i do not believe the united states supreme court is going to launch another culture war, just like r
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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